Yasmine SASSA

Yasmine SASSA

Yasmine SASSA

Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and Condensed Matter Physics, Uppsala, Sweden

Yasmine Sassa performed her PhD at the synchrotron Swiss Light Source (SLS) of the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland at the Surface / Interface: Spectroscopy (SIS) beamline.  During her PhD, she has developed and optimized a Pulsed laser Deposition (PLD) set-up for the elaboration of superconducting and magnetic thin-films. This experimental set-up can be connected to the angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) end-station at SIS beamline where samples are transferred and measured in situ (without cleaving).  By this method, Yasmine Sassa succeeded in obtaining high-quality ARPES data from previously inaccessible samples, but also opened the door for studies of multilayers materials (e.g. YBa2Cu3O7-x/ La0.7Ca0.3MnO3 superlattices).

From June 2011 to April 2013, she worked as post-doctoral researcher at the Swiss Federal Institute of Zürich (ETH Zürich), Switzerland at the solid-state physics department.  In May 2013, she got promoted as senior assistant scientist in the same department. Her scientific work mainly consisted of the study of the electronic properties of correlated materials using ARPES both in the ultraviolet and soft X-Ray range. Specifically, she has intensified her work on high-temperature superconductors (HTSC) in order to clarify the pairing mechanism, but also started up new project in the field of heavy fermion compounds in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratories and EPF Lausanne, as well as novel measurements on organic semiconductors.

In 2014 Yasmine Sassa has obtained her own funding through the Swedish Foundation Wenner-Gren and moved in 2015 at the Department of Physics and Astronomy in Uppsala University. She is setting up a time-resolved ARPES set-up at Uppsala University and she is involved in the development of a coincidence end-station in the German synchrotron BESSY II. Her scientific research is still focused on highly correlated materials and has extended her experimental knowledge to neutron scattering and muon spin rotation experiments.

In parallel to her research programs, she has acted as assistant lecturer of two Master’s degree courses in solid state physics at ETH Zürich and organized the summer course “Applications of Synchrotron Radiation in Natural Sciences” in August 2016. She has also supervised several students in and towards their master as well as PhD theses.